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Posts in 'Recommendations' category

An interview on security challenges of organizations deploying IoT

On July 12th, I was interviewed on Security challenges of organizations deploying IoT. The recorded (and transcribed) video interview can be found here. For those who prefer a written abstract, here is the outline of what I said in reply to a short set of questions about the security challenges with IoT deployment, and the approach followed at Pelion to overcome them.

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Recommended Podcast: Risky Business

I've been listening to the Risky Business security podcast for several years now, and mark it as among my favorite security podcasts, if not my favorite one. There are a few good security podcasts out there, but this is the one I listen to most rigorously, i.e., without missing an episode. Here is what makes this security podcast stand out.

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TEDTalk: "The counterintuitive way to be more persuasive"

This is a brilliant TED Talk by Niro Sivanathan.

It introduces the dilution effect. Information that is less relevant is not merely discarded, but rather dilutes the impact of the information that is relevant. So next time you bring up arguments for something, remember that your arguments don’t add up – they average out.

TEDTalk: The counterintuitive way to be more persuasive

Book review: "Permanent Record"

The book “Permanent Record” is best known for its author, Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who released enormous amounts of secret NSA documents to the press, alleging that the intelligence community in the US violates the rights of citizens for privacy by implementing wide-reaching programs of wholesale surveillance. This is the second book I review that discusses Ed Snowden and his revelations; the previous book I reviewed was “No Place to Hide” by journalist Glenn Greenwald.

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Book review: "Data and Goliath"

After sitting in my reading list for years, I finally got to read “Data and Goliath” by Bruce Schneier. Overall, this book is as well written as all of Schneier’s books, and is just as scientifically accurate (to the best that I could tell). However, whoever the audience for his book is, they may find it missing essential parts that make it not just a pleasant read, but also a useful one.

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GSA Executive Forum

I will be speaking at the GSA Israel Executive Forum on October 14,2015.

The keynote I will deliver is titled: “Security: the Key Challenge to IoT Adoption”.

For more information visit the event website.

Added on 2015-10-15: You can find the keynote slide-deck attached to this post.

TEDTalk review: "Why Privacy Matters" by Glenn Greenwald

TED published an excellent talk: Why Privacy Matters, by Glenn Greenwald.

Seldom do I call an online lecture “a must for all audience", but the TED lecture by Glenn Greenwald is worth such an enforcement. Glenn Greenwald is one of the key reporters who published material based on the leaks of Edward Snowden. He also wrote a good book about it called “No Place to Hide"; a book on which I wrote a review about 6 months ago.

If you know that privacy is important, but cannot explain why people who’ve done nothing wrong need it, or worse yet, if you really do not see why a surveillance state is bad also for law-abiding citizens, then you must listen to this. It packs hours of social, psychological, and public policy discussions into a few minutes.

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Book review: "No place to hide" by Glenn Greenwald

I just finished reading the book “No Place to Hide“, by the journalist Glenn Greenwald. The book talks about the revelations from Edward Snowden on the actions taken by the NSA, as well as about their implications. It is not the  book you can’t take your hands off, but it is certainly a worthy read and conveys a very well elaborated message.

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The status of TrueCrypt

I wish I knew where TrueCrypt stands now, but I don’t. I follow TrueCrypt and regularly endorse it  ever since I discovered it and wrote this post nine years ago. TrueCrypt was, and may still be, the most sensible and presumably-secure volume and full-disk encryption software for Windows; also supporting Linux and Mac. A few days ago the project discontinued, and users were directed to alternative, non-open-source solutions.

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