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  2015-05-24

Book review: "Creativity, Inc." by Ed Catmull

  By Hagai Bar-El   , 190 words
Categories: Sources

This is an untypical management book. Aside of the fact that it is very well written, it is full of insights that you can actually relate to and use. It makes sense, and unlike other management books that “make sense” because they preach obvious trivialities, this one brings up points that are truly insightful.

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  2015-05-16

Running an effective security research team

  By Hagai Bar-El   , 2265 words
Categories: Management

I have been running a security research group at Sansa Security since 2006, and while I think about it often, I never bothered to publish any post about how to run an effective security research team. So here is a first post on this topic, with an anticipation for writing additional installments in the future.

I will address a few random topics that come to my mind this moment, about staffing, external interaction, being in the know, and logging. Feel free to bring up other topics of interest as comments to this post.

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  2015-04-28

ARM Taiwan Security Seminar

  By Hagai Bar-El   , 205 words
Categories: Personal News

I will be speaking in the ARM Security Seminar in Taipei, Taiwan. The title of the talk is “Future proofing your security architecture”.

Following is the talk abstract:

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  2015-03-01

My blog's 10th anniversary

  By Hagai Bar-El   , 287 words
Categories: Personal News

Today it is ten years since the first post on this blog was published. This blog superseded an email bulletin that I maintained for seven years beforehand.

I am not the best blogger ever. I write much less frequently than I planned and wanted. Writing takes time that I do not always have; but more importantly, I try not to write unless I have something unique to say, and by doing this I feel I differentiate this blog from hundreds of others.

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  2015-02-16

TEDTalk review: "Why Privacy Matters" by Glenn Greenwald

  By Hagai Bar-El   , 324 words
Categories: Security Policies, Sources

TED published an excellent talk: Why Privacy Matters, by Glenn Greenwald.

Seldom do I call an online lecture “a must for all audience", but the TED lecture by Glenn Greenwald is worth such an enforcement. Glenn Greenwald is one of the key reporters who published material based on the leaks of Edward Snowden. He also wrote a good book about it called “No Place to Hide"; a book on which I wrote a review about 6 months ago.

If you know that privacy is important, but cannot explain why people who’ve done nothing wrong need it, or worse yet, if you really do not see why a surveillance state is bad also for law-abiding citizens, then you must listen to this. It packs hours of social, psychological, and public policy discussions into a few minutes.

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  2015-02-15

Top challenges of securing IoT

  By Hagai Bar-El   , 917 words
Categories: Security Engineering

As much as there is hype about the Internet of Things (IoT) and protecting it, there is no such thing as “IoT Security” per se. There is just the usual security engineering that is applied to IoT. Security engineering is about determining assets, threats to assets, and cost-effective means of mitigation. There are many models and ways for carrying out such analysis, but for the most part they all boil down to those key elements. Such security analysis applies to networks, it applies to servers, it applies to cars, and it also applies to IoT. That said, security engineering in IoT does pose a few unique challenges, which I would like to discuss now.

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  2015-02-11

Data about you is never thrown away

  By Hagai Bar-El   , 114 words
Categories: Personal News, Security Policies

I was quoted by The Enquirer saying that we shall all assume that data (from wearables and otherwise) that is collected by service providers will never be deleted. The data collected by wearables is only as protected as the network that holds it – and it is likely to be stored indefinitely.

“The trend today, given the ever-decreasing cost of storage, is to store data forever. A CIO will prefer to pay a bit more for a little more disk space than risk his job and company prosperity by deciding to discard data that is one day determined to have been useful.”

EDITED TO ADD: This story was also pubished by USA Today, and others.

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