Category: "Cyber Security"

About the cyber-security category

  17:38, by Hagai Bar-El   , 59 words
Categories: Cyber Security

The Cybersecurity category is devoted to articles discussing the protection of critical infrastructure, and other homeland-security related topics. The term "Cybersecurity" is often abused, in my opinion, and is sometimes stretched to cover everything that normally falls into the wide domain of network security. When categorizing the essays in this blog I will stick to the narrower definition above.

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  2015-08-05

Unsafe IoT safes

  21:07, by Hagai Bar-El   , 154 words
Categories: Security Engineering, Cyber Security

I have been saying that one of the challenges with securing IoT is that IoT device makers don't have the necessary security background, and the security industry does not do enough to make cyber-security more accessible to manufacturers. We should therefore not be surprised that 150 years of experience in making robust safes and transferring money securely, did not help Brinks once they introduced a USB slot into one of their new models.

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  2015-07-29

CyberDay lecture on IoT security challenges

  13:03, by Hagai Bar-El   , 41 words
Categories: Personal News, Cyber Security

Today I attended CyberDay 2015, where I delivered a lecture titled "Challenges in Securing IoT".

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  2015-07-22

Why secure e-voting is so hard to get

  23:07, by Hagai Bar-El   , 1708 words
Categories: Security Engineering, Security Policies, Cyber Security

A few days ago I gave a lecture about innovation and one topic that came up was the security of e-voting. It is widely accepted by the security community that e-voting cannot be made secure enough, and yet existing literature on the topic seems to lack high level discussion on the basis for this assumption.

Following is my opinion on why reliable fully digital e-voting cannot be accomplished given its threat and security models.

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  2014-04-09

OpenSSL "Heartbleed" bug: what's at risk on the server and what is not

  22:56, by Hagai Bar-El   , 1223 words
Categories: IT Security, Cyber Security, Counter-media

A few days ago, a critical bug was found in the common OpenSSL library. OpenSSL is the library that implements the common SSL and TLS security protocols. These protocols facilitate the encrypted tunnel feature that secure services -- over the web and otherwise -- utilize to encrypt the traffic between the client (user) and the server.

The discovery of such a security bug is a big deal. Not only that OpenSSL is very common, but the bug that was found is one that can be readily exploited remotely without any privilege on the attacker's side. Also, the outcome of the attack that is made possible is devastating. Exploiting the bug allows an attacker to obtain internal information, in the form of memory contents, from the attacked server or client. This memory space that the attacker can obtain a copy of can contain just about everything. Almost.

There are many essays and posts about the "everything" that could be lost, so I will take the optimistic side and dedicate this post to the "almost". As opposed to with other serious attacks, at least the leak is not complete and can be quantified, and the attack is not persistent.

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  2014-02-01

CyberTech 2014

  21:10, by Hagai Bar-El   , 438 words
Categories: IT Security, Cyber Security, Events, Counter-media

I attended CyberTech 2014 on January 27th-28th. CyberTech is a respectable conference for technologies related to cyber-security. The conference consisted of lectures and an exhibition. The lectures were most given by top notch speakers from the security space, both from the public sector and from the private sector; most being highly ranked executives. The exhibition sported companies ranging from the largest conglomerates as IBM and Microsoft, to garage start-ups.

I am easy to disappoint by cyber-security conferences. Simply put, there are more cyber-security conferences than what the security industry really has to say. This implies that for the security architect or practitioner, most cyber-security conferences lack sufficient substance. I take CyberTech 2014 with mixed emotions too. The exhibition showed interesting ideas, especially by start-ups, while the lectures left more to wish for.

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  2013-07-06

The difference between Cyber Security and just Security

  19:24, by Hagai Bar-El   , 637 words
Categories: IT Security, Security Policies, Cyber Security, Counter-media

The concept of "Cyber Security" is surely the attention grabber of the year. All security products and services enjoy a boost in their perception of importance, and sales, by merely prepending the word "cyber" to their description. But how is cyber security different than just security?

It differs, but it is not an entirely different domain, at least not from the technology perspective.

Security protects against malicious attacks. Attacks involve an attacker, an attack target, and the attack method, which exploits one or more vulnerabilities in the target. When speaking of cyber attacks, it is common to refer to a nation state attacking another, or to an organization attacking a state. Referring to unorganized individual hackers as executing "cyber attacks", while being a common trend, is a blunt misuse of the "cyber" term in its common meaning. And still, cyber security is not as dramatically different than traditional security.

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  2011-07-30

Handling the Security Aspect of Smart Grid Product Purchasing

  23:33, by Hagai Bar-El   , 1581 words
Categories: Security Engineering, Cyber Security

Smart Grid security is one of the new emerging fields of security. Everybody knows that the new generation of electricity grids requires a new level of security against cyber-wars, cyber-terrorism, and all the rest. Yet, for the purchaser of Smart Grid solutions, it is not always obvious where to start and that to require. The topic is wide, complex, and not very well documented. I do not intend to write a compendium here, but I will share my perspective on how an integrator, or purchaser, may prefer to approach the problem of evaluating Smart Grid solutions from the security perspective.

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